June 15, 2015

Urza's Art School

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If you watched much of Grand Prix Charlotte this past weekend, chances are good that you spotted players playing Red-Green Tron on camera at some point. As one of the most successful big mana decks in the format—heck, one of the most successful decks in the format, full stop—the Tron deck has plenty of fans and adherents.

For the fans of the Tron—so named because getting all three in play is called the "Urzatron" by many players—one of the signatures of their deck is having the "right" selection of lands. And since the three Urza lands were printed in Antiquities, Fifth Edition, Eighth Edition, and Ninth Edition, players have some choices.

While I’m writing this ahead of Grand Prix Charlotte, I think it’s safe to assume that the commentators will have, at some point, remarked on the art and expansion chosen for a player’s Urza lands. So today I thought we’d take a look at the art descriptions (and the art) for the Ninth Edition versions. Some of these descriptions also came from Eighth Edition, which used some of the same art.

Urza’s Mine

Urza's Mine | Art by Brian Snoddy

Color: None (land)

This land card represents a magical mine (like coal mine, not land mine) where pure mana is forcibly extracted from the earth by artifacts. The mine is the third in a trio that also includes a tower and a fantasy version of a power plant.

Urza’s Tower

Urza's Tower | Art by Brian Snoddy

Color: None (land)

This land card represents a huge, ornate tower. It should have the same look/feel as the Mine and Power Plant.

Urza’s Power Plant

Urza's Power Plant | Art by Brian Snoddy

Color: None (land)

This land card represents a magical "power plant"—a generator that creates pure mana.



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